PerkinElmer

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Malting/Brewing

PerkinElmer provides testing solutions, from incoming barley to malting and brewing processes, beer testing, and even ensuring the quality of bottles and cans. Measure for composition, functionality, and safety. Today, maltsters test barley and finished malt using a wide range of analytical methods to ensure process efficiency. Testing confirms the finished malt has the qualities and characteristics requested by their customers. In addition to NIR grain analyzers, we offer unique tools such as the Rapid Visco Analyser and the Falling Number method for sprout damage detection. Use our GC-MS to monitor the key flavor components during wort boiling and fermentation. Optimization of these processes can provide energy savings, increased capacity, and improved beer quality.

Malting/Brewing Related Content

Screening Ingredients

Brewing adjuncts method - RVA 17.04

This application describes the use of an RVA to assess the effect of added ingredients on the mashing behavior of a malt. Malts are tested with and without added enzymes, adjuncts or chemicals (e.g. pH modifiers). The differences are used to determine the improvement or deterioration in mashing behavior of the malt due to the addition.

Malt (kilned) method - RVA 16.04

The method is first used to establish the malting potential calibration for the variety of interest. To do this, a number of malts varying in known malting potential for the selected variety are tested. From the viscograms, the peak viscosity, time to peak, breakdown, peak area, holding strength and final viscosity are measured. These parameters are fitted as dependent variables against conventional measures of malting quality using standard regression techniques. The loge transformation may be used as appropriate. The most highly correlated viscogram parameters may subsequently be measured in malts of unknown potential for the same variety, using the regression equation to predict the potential malting quality of the sample. Good correlations using loge time to peak and loge peak area have been demonstrated.

Mash viscosity characterization method - RVA 38.01

This procedure is based on the method of Goode et al. (2005) using malted and unmalted barley, to study the effect of endogenous enzyme and added adjunct levels, respectively, on mash viscosity. This profile can be used to check the suitability of a batch of grain for mashing, or for checking the appropriate level of added adjunct in the mashing system.The RVA is used as a laboratory-scale rheological tool for the characterization of mash viscosity, allowing the brewer to monitor the processes that are taking place during mashing.

Barley (stored) method - RVA 14.02

Barley must retain high viability level in storage, typically above 95%, to be accepted for malting. The RVA Stirring Number test provides a rapid method for assessing sprout damage in malting barley.

Malt quality method - RVA 39.01

The profiles in this method are modified from the procedures of Broadhead et al. (2004), using malted barley and wheat.In studying barley malt and modified malt samples for distilling performance, Broadhead et al. (2004) used a 30-minute heating profile on the RVA to successfully identify malts.

Analysis of Moisture, Protein, Soluble Protein and Color in Barley malt using DA 7200 NIR Analyzer

Analysis of Moisture, Protein, Soluble Protein and Color in Barley malt using the DA 7200 NIR Analyzer

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Grain Testing Solutions Brochure

The grain industry is very complex. It’s global, diverse, and can also present analytical challenges. Today’s grain users demand more when it comes to quality, safety, and uniformity. In addition, they seek diverse products with unique characteristics. PerkinElmer is equipped to help the grain industry in its quest to feed the world – nutritiously and economically. Our testing and analysis solutions encompass the three primary areas required for complete knowledge of grains and their derivatives – composition, functionality, and safety.

Commodity Process Monitoring, Management and Optimization

Brewing adjuncts method - RVA 17.04

This application describes the use of an RVA to assess the effect of added ingredients on the mashing behavior of a malt. Malts are tested with and without added enzymes, adjuncts or chemicals (e.g. pH modifiers). The differences are used to determine the improvement or deterioration in mashing behavior of the malt due to the addition.

Malt (kilned) method - RVA 16.04

The method is first used to establish the malting potential calibration for the variety of interest. To do this, a number of malts varying in known malting potential for the selected variety are tested. From the viscograms, the peak viscosity, time to peak, breakdown, peak area, holding strength and final viscosity are measured. These parameters are fitted as dependent variables against conventional measures of malting quality using standard regression techniques. The loge transformation may be used as appropriate. The most highly correlated viscogram parameters may subsequently be measured in malts of unknown potential for the same variety, using the regression equation to predict the potential malting quality of the sample. Good correlations using loge time to peak and loge peak area have been demonstrated.

Mash viscosity characterization method - RVA 38.01

This procedure is based on the method of Goode et al. (2005) using malted and unmalted barley, to study the effect of endogenous enzyme and added adjunct levels, respectively, on mash viscosity. This profile can be used to check the suitability of a batch of grain for mashing, or for checking the appropriate level of added adjunct in the mashing system.The RVA is used as a laboratory-scale rheological tool for the characterization of mash viscosity, allowing the brewer to monitor the processes that are taking place during mashing.

Malt quality method - RVA 39.01

The profiles in this method are modified from the procedures of Broadhead et al. (2004), using malted barley and wheat.In studying barley malt and modified malt samples for distilling performance, Broadhead et al. (2004) used a 30-minute heating profile on the RVA to successfully identify malts.

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Grain Testing Solutions Brochure

The grain industry is very complex. It’s global, diverse, and can also present analytical challenges. Today’s grain users demand more when it comes to quality, safety, and uniformity. In addition, they seek diverse products with unique characteristics. PerkinElmer is equipped to help the grain industry in its quest to feed the world – nutritiously and economically. Our testing and analysis solutions encompass the three primary areas required for complete knowledge of grains and their derivatives – composition, functionality, and safety.

Finished Product Verification

Malt quality method - RVA 39.01

The profiles in this method are modified from the procedures of Broadhead et al. (2004), using malted barley and wheat.In studying barley malt and modified malt samples for distilling performance, Broadhead et al. (2004) used a 30-minute heating profile on the RVA to successfully identify malts.

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Beer, Grain and Wine Compendium

Grain Testing Solutions Brochure

The grain industry is very complex. It’s global, diverse, and can also present analytical challenges. Today’s grain users demand more when it comes to quality, safety, and uniformity. In addition, they seek diverse products with unique characteristics. PerkinElmer is equipped to help the grain industry in its quest to feed the world – nutritiously and economically. Our testing and analysis solutions encompass the three primary areas required for complete knowledge of grains and their derivatives – composition, functionality, and safety.

Malting/Brewing Related Technologies