WEBINAR

High-Throughput High-Content Screening with 3D Cell Models

Introduction

Part 2 of A Webinar Series: Towards Physiological Relevance - High Content Analysis with 3D Organoids and Spheroids

In this webinar, learn from two leading scientists about their approaches to high-throughput high-content screening of 3D cell models.

Ben-300x300.jpg


Functional Screening of Patient-Derived Organoid Models to Optimize Therapeutic Selection

Dr. Ben Hopkins

Assistant Professor, Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Dan-300x300.jpg

High-Content Screening Drug Discovery Targeting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity in Cancer

Dr. Dan LaBarbera

Director, CU AMC Center for Drug Discovery Co-Director, Drug Discovery and Development Shared Resource (D3SR), The Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Abstracts:

Functional Screening of Patient-Derived Organoid Models to Optimize Therapeutic Selection

With the advent of high throughput sequencing, it is now possible to identify the genetic events that give rise to and sustain each individual tumor. However, our capacity to translate this information into effective clinical care remains limited. 

Find out how Dr. Hopkins and team have developed a pipeline to functionally evaluate 3D organoid models from patients with GU tumors to determine if their precision oncology workflows can be used to help guide clinical decision making, utilizing the combined infrastructure of the Mount Sinai Functional Genomics Pipeline which develops and functionally tests patient derived models, and the resources of the Mount Sinai Genitourinary Cancer Team.

High-Content Screening Drug Discovery Targeting Epithelial-Mesenchymal Plasticity in Cancer

Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a driving force in promoting malignant cancer, including initiation, growth, and metastasis. EMT is a dynamic process that can undergo a mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) and partial transitions between both phenotypes, termed epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity (EMP). In cancer, the acquisition of EMP results in a spectrum of phenotypes, promoting tumor cell heterogeneity and resistance to standard of care therapy.