PerkinElmer

High Content Screening Instruments

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Get the sensitivity and throughput you need to image more samples and analyze more parameters with high content screening. Our high content screening instruments help you answer the most complex biological questions. With powerful yet simple imaging and analysis capabilities for a wide range of applications -- from basic research to assay development and screening -- these powerful high content screening microscope systems produce the highest possible image quality to take your research further, in less time than ever before, especially when combined with PerkinElmer's robotic systems and advanced data analytics.

For research use only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Products & Services (3)
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  • Operetta FrontAngle green copy

    Operetta High-Content Imaging System

    The Operetta system is no longer available, and has been replaced by the Operetta CLS high-content analysis system.
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    Operetta CLS High-Content Analysis System

    Uncover deep biological understanding in your everyday assays and innovative applications using the Operetta CLS high-content analysis system. Featuring a unique combination of technologies, the system delivers all the speed, sensitivity and resolution you need to reveal fine sub-cellular details. And with our simple, powerful Harmony 4.5 software, Operetta CLS lets you find even subtle phenotypic changes.
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    Opera Phenix High-Content Screening System

    The Opera Phenix High Content Screening System is the premier confocal solution for today's most demanding high content applications. Drawing on over a decade of experience with the industry-leading Opera® High Content Screening System, the Opera Phenix is designed for high-throughput, phenotypic screening and assays involving complex disease models, such as live cells, primary cells and microtissues.
Business Insights (7)
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  • Application Note

    Phenotypic Analysis of Hypertrophy in Human iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Learn how a phenotypic screening assay to study time-dependent effects of endothelin-1-induced hypertrophy was set up using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes. Learn how: The Opera Phenix system has been applied in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. In this assay, the Opera Phenix system is 4 times faster than the previous Opera® system. Primary neuron morphology is analyzed in a straightforward approach using Harmony software. Careful assay optimization can increase throughput, and minimize the data burden, without compromising assay performance.

  • Application Note

    Measuring FRET using the Opera Phenix High-Content Screening System

    Fundamental processes in living cells, such as apoptosis and signal transduction are controlled by proteins, often acting in concert with other protein partners through protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Inappropriate protein-protein recognition can fundamentally contribute to many diseases, including cancer. Therefore, inhibiting protein-protein interactions represents an emerging area in drug design.

  • Application Note

    Analyzing ERK Signal Transduction in Live Cells Using a FRET-Based Biosensor

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a key component in the regulation of embryogenesis, cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and cell death. The ERK signaling pathway is altered in various cancer types and is frequently investigated as a target for therapeutic intervention. This application note describes how a live cell FRET assay to study ERK signaling was performed on the Operetta CLS™ high-content analysis system. The optimized design of the FRET-based biosensor, the high-quality imaging of the Operetta CLS system and the easy-to-use image analysis tools of the Harmony® software contribute to the robustness of the high-content assay.

  • Application Note

    Phenotypic Profiling of Autophagy using the Opera Phenix High-Content Screening System

    Cells constantly sense their environment and their response is a spatio-temporal summation of all signals. To maintain physiological stability, cells need to adjust to environmental changes, a process called homeostasis. One of the most important processes involved in maintaining homeostasis is autophagy, and its significance was recognized by the award of the Nobel Prize for Physiology in 2016 to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discovery of its underlying mechanisms. Although this is not fully understood, it is believed that autophagy can prevent tumor development by degrading, for example, damaged organelles and protein aggregates.

  • Application Note

    Distinguishing Cell Types by Phenotypic Profiling of the Nucleus

    The promise of high-content screening is the acceleration of discovery by extracting as much relevant information as possible from cells. Nevertheless, a large percentage of high-content screens analyze only a small number of image-based properties. As a result, valuable information from precious cells and disease models is not utilized. As nearly all screening approaches require a nuclear counterstain such as Hoechst to facilitate segmentation, phenotypic profiling of the nuclei can offer new and additional perspectives on assays at no extra cost.

  • Application Note

    Imaging Bile Canaliculi in 3D Liver Microtissues using the Opera Phenix HCS System

    Analyzing transport of biliary metabolites is essential to predict pharmacokinetics and hepatotoxicity during drug development. A functional impairment of hepatobilary transporters, such as bile salt export pump (BSEP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP-2), is strongly associated with an increased risk of cholestatic liver injury. Here, we describe a 3D high-content screening assay to study hepatobiliary transporter function in InSphero human liver microtissues. Confocal imaging and automated image analysis were used to quantify BSEP and MRP-2-mediated efflux of fluorescent substrates into bile canaliculi.

  • Case Study

    High-Content Analysis of Drug-Induced Oligodendrocyte Differentiation Promoting Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis

    One of the greatest challenges in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapy is the halting or reversal of the failure of remyelination in the brain in order to reverse disabilities in MS patients. This case study highlights the recent work of Dr. Paul Tesar and colleagues at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, which could potentially lead to such novel treatments, as it aims to control the function of stem cells in the body and thereby to help the body repair itself.